Sunday, March 26, 2017

Course Schedule for 2012

Please note that you must register and log in before you can download readings (there is a Login box on the right side of this page with a register link). Also note that some linked reading files are quite large and may take a minute or two to download in your browser window.

Monday Morning

  • Introductions and course logistics
  • Why Social Networks? Introduction to social network concepts
  • Whole versus personal networks
  • One-mode versus two-mode data
  • Boundary definition

Reading

Borgatti, S P, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. (2008). Introduction. In Analyzing Social Networks. S P Borgatti, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. Pp. 1–7.

Borgatti, S P, A Mehra, D J Brass, and G Labianca (2009). Network Analysis in the Social Sciences. Science 323(5916), 892-895.

Borgatti, S P, Everett, J Johnson, and Stevenson, eds. (2008). Collecting Network Data. In Analyzing Social Networks. S P Borgatti, Everett, J Johnson, and Stevenson, eds. Pp. 1–29.

Galaskiwicz, J, and S Wasserman (1993). Social Network Analysis: Concepts, Methodology, and Directions for the 1990s. Sociological Methods & Research 22(1), 3-22.

Johnson, J.C.Stanley Wasserman and Joseph Galaskiewicz (1994). Anthropological Contributions to the Study of Social Networks. In Advances in Social Network Analysis. Stanley Wasserman and Joseph Galaskiewicz, eds. Pp. 113–151. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Kossinets, Gueorgi (2006). Effects of Missing Data in Social Networks. Social Networks 28(3), 247-268.

McCarty, Christopher, and H Russell BernardK Christensen and D Levinson (2003). Social Network Analysis. In Encyclopedia of Community: From the Village to the Virtual World. K Christensen and D Levinson, eds. Pp. 1–6. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Marsden, P.V. (1990). Network Data and Measurement. Annual Review of Sociology 16, 435-463

Monday Afternoon

    Collecting network data for whole networks (plus attribute data. Time 1):

  • One-mode from class
  • Two-mode from class using attendance at conferences
    Introduction to UCINET:

  • Overview of program (UCINET and Netdraw)
  • Introduction to DL – the datalanguage
  • Introduction to Transform menu
    Homework:

  • Create new one-mode data set among participants and input into UCINET

Reading

Borgatti, S P, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. (2008). Working with Group Membership: 2-Mode Data. In Analyzing Social Networks. S P Borgatti, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. Pp. 1–5.

Borgatti, S P, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. (2008). Data Preparation. In Analyzing Social Networks. S P Borgatti, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. Pp. 1–9.

Tuesday Morning

    Social network metrics (graph theoretic concepts) and other procedures:

  • Directed versus undirected data (example from sample database)
  • Strength of tie
  • Components, cliques, kplexes, centrality, cohesion, connectivity, density, core-periphery, centralization, structural equivalence, and block models
  • Statistical techniques. MDS, QAP, cluster analysis

Reading

Borgatti, S P, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. (2008). Centrality. In Analyzing Social Networks. S P Borgatti, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. Pp. 1–7.

Marsden, P.V., and K.E. Campbell 1984Measuring Tie Strength. Social Forces 63(2), 482-501.

Borgatti, S P, Everett, J. Johnson, and Stevenson, eds. (2008). Cohesive Subgroups. In Analyzing Social Networks. S P Borgatti, Everett, J. Johnson, and Stevenson, eds. Pp. 1–8.

Borgatti, S P, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. (2008). Positions. In Analyzing Social Networks. S P Borgatti, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. Pp. 1–13.

Borgatti, S P, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. (2008). Testing Network Hypotheses. In Analyzing Social Networks. S P Borgatti, Everett, J. Johnson, Stevenson, eds. Pp. 1–12.

Tuesday Afternoon

  • Social network visualization
  • Netdraw (Hanneman Chapter 4)
  • Mage/King
  • Application of attributes (compositional and structural measures)
    Homework:

  • Collect attribute data from each participant
  • Import it into Netdraw
  • Create visualization that helps interpret structure

Reading

Freeman, Linton C. (2000). Visualizing social networks. Journal of Social Structure 1, 1

Borgatti, S P, Everett, J Johnson, and Stevenson, eds. (2008). Visualization. In Analyzing Social Networks. S P Borgatti, Everett, J Johnson, and Stevenson, eds. Pp. 1–30.

Wednesday Morning

  • Collect whole network data (time 2) from class
  • Using social network data in conventional statistical models
  • Longitudinal networks
    Case study of whole network analysis with data from Jeff Johnson:

  • Collecting data
  • Getting data in
  • Transforming data
  • Analyzing data with Ucinet and Netdraw
  • Play with UCINET datasets with background materials

Reading

Johnson, JC, JS Boster, and LA Palinkas (2003). Social Roles and the Evolution of Networks in Extreme and Isolated Environments. Journal of Mathematical Sociology 27(2-3), 89-121.

Burk, W J, C E G Steglich, and T A B Snijders (2007). Beyond Dyadic Interdependence: Actor-Oriented Models for Co-Evolving Social Networks and Individual Behaviors. International Journal of Behavioral Development 31(4), 397-404.

Padgett, J.F., and C.K. Ansell (1993). Robust Action and the Rise of the Medici, 1400-1434. American Journal of Sociology 98(6), 1259-1319

Breiger, R.L. (1974). The Duality of Persons and Groups. Social Forces 53(2), 181-190.

Wednesday Afternoon

    Introduction to personal networks:

  • Composition versus structure
  • Steps to personal network study/Introduction to Egonet
    Ways to elicit network alters:

  • Freelist
  • Chronologically
  • First names
  • Structured
    Using personal network size to estimate the size of uncountable populations:

  • Estimating network size
  • Using the network scale-up method to estimate the size of uncountable populations (The Network Scale-Up Method: Background and Theory and http://tinyurl.com/cpw4x4 )

Reading

McCarty, C. Chapter 14: How to Analyze Your Own Personal Network. Pp. 1–29.

Brewer, D.D. (2000). Forgetting in the Recall-Based Elicitation of Personal and Social Networks. Social Networks 22(1), 29-44.

McCarty, C, H.R. Bernard, P.D. Killworth, GA Shelley, and EC Johnsen (1997). Eliciting Representative Samples of Personal Networks. Social Networks 19(4), 303-323.

McCarty, C, and S Govindaramanujam (2005). A Modified Elicitation of Personal Networks Using Dynamic Visualization. Connections 26(2), 61-69.

McCarty, C, P.D. Killworth, H.R. Bernard, E.C. Johnsen, and G.A. Shelley (2001). Comparing Two Methods for Estimating Network Size. Human Organization 60(1), 28-39.

Roberts, Sam G B, Robin I M Dunbar, Thomas V Pollet, and Toon Kuppens (2009). Exploring Variation in Active Network Size: Constraints and Ego Characteristics. Social Networks 31(2), 138-146.

Bernard, H. Russ and Christopher McCarty (2009). The Network Scale-Up Method: Background and Theory.

McCarty, C., and H. Russ Bernard. (2009). How to conduct a network scale-up Survey.

Thursday Morning

  • Present individual networks
  • Interview each other using personal network visualization
    Combine individual data sets:

  • Import into SPSS
  • Test personal network metrics against respondent variables

Thursday Afternoon

  • Research design using social networks: Design a study in class
  • Question and answers about methods
    Homework alternatives for Thursday evening: Fifteen-minute presentation about social network research including:

  • Design a whole network study (proposal)
  • Design a personal network study (proposal)
  • Analyze a network dataset and present findings
  • Make a case for using social networks versus more conventional and easier to collect data

Friday Morning

    Class presentations (proposals, analysis of participant data, analysis of other data)

  • Fifteen-minute presentation by participants
  • Fifteen-minute discussion by class

Friday Afternoon

    Class presentations (continued)

  • Fifteen-minute presentation by participants
  • Fifteen-minute discussion by class